Uh oh…someone called the cops

Police: Good evening, are you the host?

Host: No.

Police: We’ve been getting complaints about this party.

Host: About the drugs?

Police: No.

Host: About the guns, then? Is somebody complaining about the guns?

Police: No, the noise.

Host: Oh, the noise. Well that makes sense because there are no guns or drugs here. (An enormous explosion is heard in the background.) Or fireworks. Who’s complaining about the noise? The neighbors?

Police: No, the neighbors fled inland hours ago. Most of the recent complaints have come from Pittsburgh. Do you think you could ask the host to quiet things down?

Host: No Problem. (At this point, a Volkswagen bug with primitive religious symbols drawn on the doors emerges from the living room and roars down the hall, past the police and onto the lawn, where it smashes into a tree. Eight guests tumble out onto the grass, moaning.) See? Things are starting to wind down.

Police: Good evening, are you the host?
Host:   No.
Police: We’ve been getting complaints about this party.
Host:   About the drugs?
Police: No.
Host:   About the guns, then?  Is somebody complaining about the guns?
Police: No, the noise.
Host:   Oh, the noise.  Well that makes sense because there are no guns
or drugs here.  (An enormous explosion is heard in the
background.)  Or fireworks.  Who’s complaining about the noise?
The neighbors?
Police: No, the neighbors fled inland hours ago.  Most of the recent
complaints have come from Pittsburgh.  Do you think you could
ask the host to quiet things down?
Host:   No Problem.  (At this point, a Volkswagen bug with primitive
religious symbols drawn on the doors emerges from the living
room and roars down the hall, past the police and onto the
lawn, where it smashes into a tree.  Eight guests tumble out
onto the grass, moaning.)  See?  Things are starting to wind
down.
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My top 10 geek epitaphs

There are several geek epitaph lists on the net (look here, here and here) but most are rather dull and they don’t really look like they’re written by real geeks, so I decided to write down my own list, with one line for each geek stereotype:

  1. the WoW player: «Met a Death Knight with serious blood abilities».
  2. the Python guru: «TombException».
  3. the Urban Terror player: «Did the lemming thing».
  4. the Star Trek fan: «Heghlu’meH QaQ jajvam».
  5. the network guru: «TTL expired in transit».
  6. the Magic player: «Opponent played Grindstone with Painter’s Servant».
  7. the Spaceballs fan: «Out of order? FUCK! Even in heaven, nothing works!».
  8. the Matrix fan: «She told me: dodge this!».
  9. the NASA fan: «What do you mean “One way mission”?».
  10. the Unix guru: «kill -9 -1».

Who said that bad grass never dies? :-)

Posted in Funny | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Best links of the week 07/2010

This week’s mood is all abourt cloud computing, html5, TED and the incoming conferences, with a trail on tablets. Balancing between seasonal hype and true link gifts is getting harder and harder:

  1. Mouse art — A program that creates nice artwork from your mouse pointer tracking.
  2. Jimmy Whales’ theory of failure — Wikipedia founder talks at TED and says: fail, fail, fail.
  3. Diagram of secure passwords — How are you choosing your passwords?
  4. The number one rule of design — Insightful analysis of the application design process.
  5. Printing is getting new life forms, like the Pencil printer and the Paperless printer.

Which is your favourite link of the week? Please share with comments or tweet.

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Linux Day all the way in 2010

A casual on-line conversation with a nice guy from Linux community:

seven: «I’m very busy preparing Linux Day 2010 at the moment.»
geekscrap: «Whoa! it’s in october, isn’t it? You’re taking it early!»
seven: «This year it’s going to be big.»

You’ve been warned.

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What Enterprise-grade really means

Recently S. Lott published a post on what’s a clear definition of Enterprise-level applications. Even though I agree with him that “Enterprise-scale” definition has been streched by marketing to mean about anything, I have to disagree with his conclusions:

  1. The fact that an enterprise running a mission-critical piece of software can actually survive to bad things(tm) by other means (falling short on their obligations?), doesn’t mean that the mission wasn’t critical, after all. Anyways, mission-critical is just a typical requisite for enterprise applications, not the definition of.
  2. If the test is “if installer is next-next-done, then it’s not Enterprise”, it can be easily falsified by examples like Oracle database or Oracle business applications, which are definitely into the Enterprise set but are rather easy to install. Obviously you can achieve complex redundancy setups with Oracle DB or MySQL DB, and both of them require special configuration activities not provided by installer.

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Multiple IP uplinks with Gentoo

When your computer or server has access to multiple LAN segments with different address spaces and different gateways to the Internet, there’s a nice feature called policy routing that allows you to use all of them simultaneously without having to re-configure your network topology. This is especially useful when you want to increase the bandwidth and resilience of a single computer or server without the burden of being an Autonomous System (BGP peering, Internet Registry bureaucracy, etc.).

Here are the steps to setup multiple uplinks through policy routing on Gentoo:

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CD overburning on Mac OS X

It seems that Toast 10 Titanium cd burning application doesn’t support overburning, so if you need to burn cd images that are larger than conventional 700MB, you can either use cdrtools from the command line with -overburn parameter (available in MacPorts), or use a nice cdrtools frontend called Firestarter FX, which is tested for Tiger and Leopard releases.

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Top 25 vulnerability RSS feeds

One way to receive up-to-date reports about vulnerability issues is subscribing to vulnerability RSS feeds: they update on demand, they don’t rely on your mail subsystem and they don’t fill up your mailbox. The only drawback is that you could miss alerts if you don’t sync your feeds for a long time, but if you’re a IT security manager, you don’t have a life, so how could it happen anyways? ;-)

Here’s the top feeds you should be subscribed to (CVE tags are reported in brackets):

  1. NIST Vulnerability Database.
  2. US Cert Technical Security Alerts [CERT].
  3. SecurityFocus Vulnerabilities [SF-INCIDENTS].
  4. Open Source Vulnerability Database [OSVDB].
  5. IBM Internet Security Systems Threats [ISS].
  6. Vupen Security Advisories [VUPEN].
  7. Secunia Latest Security Advisories (Unofficial) [SECUNIA].
  8. eEye Security Advisories [EEYE].

The above list is also available as OPML file you can import into your feed reader.

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Best links of the week 06/2010

It’s Sunday, just relax and enjoy your weekly juice:

  1. USIM card with an embedded Wi-Fi radio — Next generation phone SIM will run local hotspots.
  2. European Credit and debit card security broken — You’d better use old signature-based cards.
  3. Infineon TPM hacked — It eventually happened. No gory details though.
  4. 21st century life in transition — What happens when you apply digital rules in analog world.
  5. Twitter History — A nice video with developers from Twitter.

If you have a little more time, you may enjoy this 20-minutes video by Jamie Oliver at TED 2010 on food education. He must have read Ned Batchelder’s tips on presentation: entertain, educate, practice.

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Integrate WordPress and Django

Last year WordPress got an award as best Open Source CMS software and the reason is clear: it’s easy to setup, low on resources, very customizable and full of useful extensions. So unless you have very specific deployment requirements and if your blog is not part of your core technology, you may get the best of both worlds by using WordPress for blogging and use a web framework for everything else. Not reinventing the wheel is very important in post-agile world, after all.

Being a Django monkey, I’d like to share some tips on how to make WordPress and Django live together:
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Posted in Coding, Tips | Tagged , , , , , , | 11 Comments